To send or not to send (that email on Saturday at 10pm)

For the longest time in my career I aimed to be the manager’s suck up.
I so badly wanted to be noticed.
I wanted my hard work to be appreciated.
And I was yearn for even the smallest compliment.

A friend of mine joked about “Just leave 5 minutes after your manager does” and “schedule emails to be send out in the weekend”.

I actually thought this was a great idea and so it happened.
Truth to be told, I was noticed more.
But not necessarily in the best way.
Statements like “You should get yourself a boyfriend  Andrea” were made.
But worse, people now started expecting that I will get the job done over the weekend or late in the evening.
And usually it were the shitty jobs nobody wanted.

I created the image that I would drop anything for work.

In my previous post Reliving the youth “trauma” I talk about not giving my full 100% capacity at work.
The remaining 20% is exactly a buffer for the times when a deadline has to be met.
In this way I can make peace with the fact that I would need to stay longer for a couple of days to finish something.

Now I am in a managing role myself.
Sometimes I see emails appearing  in the weekend, in the evening and once even at 3 in the night (??)

Now, I’m sure there are managers who are workaholics, but most of them are human like you and me.
So unless there is a personal issue or the turbine is on fire, it’s perfectly fine to use the hours outside work to recharge your battery and let me do the same.

As for thinking you’re not being noticed; it happens more than you imagine.
The best compliment I once got was when I found a badly drawn smiley on a sticky note on my computer.
It was my from my manager, the day after I had worked hard on a presentation to defend a safety point of view we both had.

When the time is right, I will make sure my team mates will have an equally nice memory of me as their team lead.

WhatsApp Image 2018-06-02 at 12.43.07

What is your experience with more than your contact defines?
Have you ever done anything to be noticed by a manager?
What’s the best compliment you’ve gotten by a manager?

10 thoughts on “To send or not to send (that email on Saturday at 10pm)

  1. When I was working a desk job, once I left the office, I did not touch work stuff. I still got noticed. I don’t think you have to do stuff like that unless you work in a department with 100 others.

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  2. I was raised to be a hard-worker, so I did these things because of that, not necessarily to suck up.
    At the beginning of my working life, I remember one of my co-workers calling me when I was on my way home about something totally non-important. Something that could have waited until the next day without any issues. Since then, I made sure that people knew I wasn’t attached to my phone 24/7, that I might be busy and not answer, and that I don’t get paid for work outside of 9-5, so to leave me alone.

    Then, I emailed my boss on the weekend to remind him of something, and he took it as a: “I’m bored, feel free to email me at all times.” And so weekend emails started. When I told him I don’t check my work email over the weekend, he started emailing me on my personal one. It would ruin my weekend, because it would stress me out about the upcoming week. So I stopped checking my personal email regularly and told him that. I ignored any emails that I might have seen, and so he stopped.

    It’s a fine line between trying to present yourself as reliable and proficient and becoming a slave.

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    1. I learned that the hard way.
      In the beginning of my career I wanted to show that I was worth the investment. Also, because I need the “permanent contract”. Once you gain that, it will be very difficult for a company to fire you, or they do and you still get a nice amount of money.

      They didn’t hand out smart phones for you to be on facebook 24/7. It’s because they can reach you all the time.
      Quite frankly, I think it’s also to track you. This GPS thing seems to know where I am each time I open an internet page, even though I turned it off (!)
      Imagine what information goes to the company. I honestly think it’s a shady move.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. I was a manager for 17 years and in the beginning I did plenty of “extras” to get noticed. As time passed… and I got older, more experienced, and became a mom, I let my performance speak for itself during business hours. This turned out to be more noticeable because I was more eager to do a better job once I was back from my uninterrupted time off. That is all over now but I wanted to share after reading this. Good luck! 👍 😉

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  4. LOL This is why from the getgo I like to establish the “I won’t be your bitch and I won’t say yes to everything” image because those people, without fail, ALWAYS GET TAKEN ADVANTAGE OF. Especially if they’re women. I’m like NOPE to that. I will work hard as an employee but I won’t be a servant you can walk all over. Also, ew to the “you should get yourself a boyfriend” comments. It’s none of their business and people can still have lives without having boyfriends. I find that to be really unprofessional and almost like harassment. Don’t you worry your heads about my love life. Also, having a life shouldn’t hinge on having an S.O… It’s def a plus but not the sole priority.

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  5. Best compliment-being compliment.

    I’m a workaholic, so I always do more than my job requires. It’s a curse, not a blessing. I advise others to slow down and pace themselves. Things can wait, your brain needs rest.

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    1. I have been a workaholic for several reasons.
      I was really passionate about my first job and didn’t mind putting in extra hours.
      The jobs after that were because the managers were bullies and didn’t accept anything what was according “their standard of perfection”.
      At my current job I am doing just about enough.
      Brain seems more rested (work wise), but now I feel physically drained.

      Liked by 1 person

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