Parent’s day

Confession: I totally forgot about mother’s day.

I only realised it when I got a disappointed text from my mum.
And then saw all the sweet posts of you guys, talking about your own mum.

I used to be that kind of child who asked for a lot of love from my parents, but also gave a lot of love back.
It was a constant of genuine hugs and saying nice things.
Not just when I was younger, but until at least I was 23.

Even though my parents enjoyed it, they also told me that it was time for me to grow up.

And so I did.
I got my own life. Found my own love.
Became more distance to my parents.
Mainly because of the actual physical distance.

I started forgetting about all those days which, in my opinion, are created to make someone feel guilty.
I’d send flowers or call with an apology way too late.
Mum and dad would always accept, but I felt the let down in their voice.

Society forces us to celebrate these days. And if we don’t, commercials would give us the feeling of guilt.
But what about all the other days?

The tables have turned.
Now it’s me who can give them some life advice.
Small things which make life easier and nicer.

I book their holidays, making sure they pay a little less than the actual amount.
I created a Netflix and Spotify account for them, lying that it’s for free so they would never feel it on a their bank account.
I’d give them my 3 months used smart phone, lying that I got a new one from work.

These things they might not notice, and I don’t want them to either.
But I do see what makes them happy and it makes me happy to be a part of that.

Hopefully the other days count a little bit more than all those yearly commercial events.

13 thoughts on “Parent’s day

  1. Nowadays it has become a norm to write long lovely posts for your parents on such occasions which is very nice but I think the small things we do for them all around the year show our love more than any message or call. Just keeping our morals intact which have been given to us by our parents should be enough to reflect the fact that they are with us at every step of our life.

  2. What a beautiful text … what a lesson due in spite of oblivion. This was irrelevant in what you have done for your parents …

  3. Agree with the commercial aspect of it – and I hate it.
    For me, having them in Sundays makes it a bit more challenging. Mom lives 1-2 hours away, depending on traffic. (So she drove in this year – and we took her to lunch.) A great Italian place that reminds us of our home, some 2800 miles away.

    And yes, doing the things we think they don’t know about, (oddly they do, and honor us by not telling us) is lots of fun. We are still the kids though! 🙂 (even at 53)

  4. Yes it’s true I’ve always found this too. Pure stimulus to consumerism. Here in Brazil it’s the same thing. Nothing different, so follow the other days as the boyfriends, the chilies and so on ..

  5. This really seems to be the trend.
    The last I annoyed myself on this was during International women’s day.
    I wrote a post about “mem who never disrespected women” 😉

    I completely agree with what you say!

  6. Eating food from your heritage is the best. Plus, Italian food is my favorite 🙂
    Do you like pasta or pizza?

    You might be right. They might notice more than we think!

  7. Pasta of course!
    It is also the atmosphere of a East Coast city “hole in the wall” type place. The kind you find in the inner city, where people have lived for generations. Family run, great food, very welcoming environment.

    you don’t find places like that in Los Angeles…. but you do in Boston and Philadelphia and the like.

  8. I think that’s more important the things that we do everyday than just on one day! My parents always teached me that! But, on mother’s day I always like to give a small present to my mother and grandmother (like a flower, for example). I really think that the things you said you do for your parents are beautiful 🙂 they should be proud of you

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